spaceplasma:

Our Two Faced Moon

Because the Moon is tidally locked, it was not until 1959 that the farside was first imaged by the Soviet Luna 3 spacecraft (hence the Russian names for prominent farside features, such as Mare Moscoviense). And what a surprise -­ unlike the widespread maria on the nearside, basaltic volcanism was restricted to a relatively few, smaller regions on the farside, and the battered highlands crust dominated. Of course the cause of the farside/nearside asymmetry is an interesting scientific question. Past studies have shown that the crust on the farside is thicker, but why is the farside crust thicker? This mystery is called the Lunar Farside Highlands Problem.
Now scientists may have solved the 55-year-old mystery. The general consensus on the moon’s origin is that it probably formed shortly after the Earth and was the result of a Mars-sized object hitting Earth with a glancing, but devastating impact. This Giant Impact Hypothesis suggests that the outer layers of the Earth and the object were flung into space and eventually formed the moon. The moon, being much smaller than Earth cooled more quickly. Because the Earth and the moon were tidally locked from the beginning, the still hot Earth — more than 2500 degrees Celsius — radiated towards the near side of the moon. The far side, away from the boiling Earth, slowly cooled, while the Earth-facing side was kept molten creating a temperature gradient between the two halves. This gradient was important for crustal formation on the moon. The moon’s crust has high concentrations of aluminum and calcium, elements that are very hard to vaporize.
Aluminum and calcium would have preferentially condensed in the atmosphere of the cold side of the moon because the nearside was still too hot. Thousands to millions of years later, these elements combined with silicates in the moon’s mantle to form plagioclase feldspars, which eventually moved to the surface and formed the moon’s crust. The farside crust had more of these minerals and is thicker.
The moon has now completely cooled and is not molten below the surface. Earlier in its history, large meteoroids struck the nearside of the moon and punched through the crust, releasing the vast lakes of basaltic lava that formed the nearside maria that make up the man in the moon. When meteoroids struck the farside of the moon, in most cases the crust was too thick and no magmatic basalt welled up, creating the dark side of the moon with valleys, craters and highlands, but almost no maria.

Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser, Penn State/A’ndrea Elyse Messer


Science! Pretty neat.

spaceplasma:

Our Two Faced Moon

Because the Moon is tidally locked, it was not until 1959 that the farside was first imaged by the Soviet Luna 3 spacecraft (hence the Russian names for prominent farside features, such as Mare Moscoviense). And what a surprise -­ unlike the widespread maria on the nearside, basaltic volcanism was restricted to a relatively few, smaller regions on the farside, and the battered highlands crust dominated. Of course the cause of the farside/nearside asymmetry is an interesting scientific question. Past studies have shown that the crust on the farside is thicker, but why is the farside crust thicker? This mystery is called the Lunar Farside Highlands Problem.

Now scientists may have solved the 55-year-old mystery. The general consensus on the moon’s origin is that it probably formed shortly after the Earth and was the result of a Mars-sized object hitting Earth with a glancing, but devastating impact. This Giant Impact Hypothesis suggests that the outer layers of the Earth and the object were flung into space and eventually formed the moon. The moon, being much smaller than Earth cooled more quickly. Because the Earth and the moon were tidally locked from the beginning, the still hot Earth — more than 2500 degrees Celsius — radiated towards the near side of the moon. The far side, away from the boiling Earth, slowly cooled, while the Earth-facing side was kept molten creating a temperature gradient between the two halves. This gradient was important for crustal formation on the moon. The moon’s crust has high concentrations of aluminum and calcium, elements that are very hard to vaporize.

Aluminum and calcium would have preferentially condensed in the atmosphere of the cold side of the moon because the nearside was still too hot. Thousands to millions of years later, these elements combined with silicates in the moon’s mantle to form plagioclase feldspars, which eventually moved to the surface and formed the moon’s crust. The farside crust had more of these minerals and is thicker.

The moon has now completely cooled and is not molten below the surface. Earlier in its history, large meteoroids struck the nearside of the moon and punched through the crust, releasing the vast lakes of basaltic lava that formed the nearside maria that make up the man in the moon. When meteoroids struck the farside of the moon, in most cases the crust was too thick and no magmatic basalt welled up, creating the dark side of the moon with valleys, craters and highlands, but almost no maria.

Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser, Penn State/A’ndrea Elyse Messer

Science! Pretty neat.

(via hajikelist)

area0302:

Cosmic Cats

Space, the meow frontier.

area0302:

Cosmic Cats

Space, the meow frontier.

(via wecansexy)

generalelectric:

At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for. Imagery by @seenewphoto.

It looks sci-fi, but it’s real!

daverapoza:

'Steve Lichman #2'

by Dave Rapoza & Dan Warren

This comic is pretty cool. Yo.

leseanthomas:

"Footage of Star V838 Mon light echo bursting in space, illuminating the interstellar dust around it at the speed of light. This is not a computer simulation. It’s an actual time-lapse video taken over four years by the Hubble—and scientists don’t know its origin yet.

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has been observing the V838 Mon light echo since 2002. Each new observation of the light echo reveals a new and unique "thin-section" through the interstellar dust around the star. This video morphs images of the light echo from the Hubble taken at multiple times between 2002 and 2006. The numerous whorls and eddies in the interstellar dust are particularly noticeable. Possibly they have been produced by the effects of magnetic fields in the space between the stars.”

Science is awesome.

Beautiful space.

Quick thing for a game I’m trying to make, whee.

Quick thing for a game I’m trying to make, whee.

aidosaur:

ananthymous:

Girl with the Skeleton Hand 2

One of several comics collected in CUTTINGS, the upcoming Johnny Wander book! It’s up for preorder on Kickstarter right now!

Fact: Cecilia has a secret fondness for elephants. There are small figurines scattered around her apartment!

johnnywander.com

I remember very vividly watching videos of grackles for this story, to find out what kinds of noises they make.

Thank you guys again so much for supporting this book!  It’s looking really really lovely so far, I think you’ll like it!

That’s really sweet, and neat.

(via hajikelist)

animationtidbits:

Blur Studio - Animation Reel

There are so many awesome ideas and stories in each of these clips. They’re like masterpiece illustrations that live and breathe.

(via killercop)

danainthedogpark:

jpbrammer:

George R. R. Martin everyone.

Who the fuck taught him how to garden?

His garden is where Audrey 2 really came from.

(via cutiecalikins)

Went for an early photo session at the Savannah Locks in Augusta, GA.